History

by Kyla

I am a history major. When I tell people this, they inevitably ask what I am ‘going to do with that’. The conversations go like this:

Person A: Oh, you’re in university! What’s your major?

Me: History. Canadian history.

Person A: Oh yeah, and what are you going to do with that?

Me: ….

Person A: ….

Me: ….

Person A: ….

Me: Uhm.

Person A: Why didn’t you go into nursing?

Oh, Person A.

I did not go into nursing because I would be a terrible nurse, and you and all other potentially ill people should get down on your knees and thank God (or whoever, if you’re not into the whole God thing) that nursing programs are filled with all sorts of wonderful men and women who actually want to be in the health care profession and therefore have a strong likelihood of actually being good at it. Me? I’d just bumble around ineptly with a vague and ever-rising panic that whatever was wrong with my patients was actually wrong with me. Hypochondriacs should not go into medicine, I’m just going to put that out there. People like me go into medicine, we start to eye, with concerning enthusiasm, all that immediate access to drugs that end in pam. You know. Lorazepam. Clonazepam. Diazepam. Oxazepam. Nitrazepam. Flurazepam. Bromazepam.

It’s not pretty. Shake your head to clear from it the horror that comes with any scenario in which I am a nurse.

The conversation proceeds.

Person A: So… what comes next?

Me: I’m thinking about grad school.

Person A: Oh! Studying what?

Me: …

Person A: …

Me: …

Person A: …

Me: Uhm.

Person A: Wow. Good luck with that.

Me, nodding: Thanks.

I realize there are people in this world who have long known what they want to do. Me? I’m more of a bumbler; I stumble into things accidentally like I stumbled into history. Studying history has made me delightfully happy; my hope is that I continue to bumble and stumble into serendipitous learning. In fact, I wish this for everyone.

May you bumble and stumble into serendipitious learning.

There is nothing more glorious than finding something good out of something unexpected; as a bumbler, I find it all unexpected. With nine months to go before graduation is this also scary? Yes. Yes, it is. But if bumbling and stumbling has led me, thus far, into all of this – VIU and history and FNAT and two children and a small garden with sugar snap peas then it is with much optimism, even eagerness, that I look to the uncertain future into which bumbling and stumbling will take me.

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